Welcome to In-Depth Week 5!

What’s new: A space junk mobile in-the-making, milk carton jellyfish (dedicated to Jeanie, of course), and… mentor contacts?

So, I’m a little behind for this post because on Saturday I was at the Zero Waste Leadership Clinic! It was a lot of fun, and I got to meet a lot of really cool people. I also hear there’s a clean energy clinic in the works, which I’m excited for because of my research project… But, back to the main subject. I got to meet the amazing Micheal Hall during this clinic, and I used some of the “How to be Interesting” tactics to make the most of the short time we had. The most important thing I took away from talking to him was that, even though this may take a lot of time, the best thing to do is to just go for it, and make stuff. One thing he said that I really connected to was falling in love with the material. He uses plastic sheets, bags and Styrofoam in his photos, and when describing how he loved the dirty, gross texture of the plastic when left out in the rain. After spending five weeks on this project, I can see what he’s talking about. The milky, translucent milk jug quickly becomes a jellyfish. The red and tan wheels from kinetic become the dusty surfaces of mars, the gaseous storms of Jupiter.  More pictures in a week or so. Promise.

A lone picture offering... I'm thinking of making this a mobile!
A lone picture offering…
I’m thinking of making this a mobile!
Courtesy of Me
Close-up on space junk surrounding Earth, courtesy of Me

Did you know that  the space junk problem we have will only get worse as time goes on? The junk currently orbiting our Earth crashes into other space junk and creates tiny, high speed fragments of debris. Contrary to what I would assume, smaller fragments still mean considerable danger to ships; even tiny flecks of paint can cause considerable erosion on the outside of spacecraft. Windshields and windows are especially susceptible to this.

 

Anyhow, this week’s topic of discussion is how to be interesting. Although the people I’ve been contacting about mentorship haven’t been able to find any artists to mentor me, they’ve come up with a few ideas and two mentor contacts I can pursue. We’ve been doing a lot of emailing back and forth, and while I realize that this isn’t a great replacement for talking in person, I think I’ve been able to incorporate some of the tactics Edward De Bono mentions. For instance, during my emails, I explored the idea of wearable recycled art . Port Moody is having a competition for Wearable Arts, and the awards are being given out this February.  I’m keeping my eye out for the cool ideas I’m sure will be portrayed, but I also know that the materials I have are not suited, nor high enough in number, to cover a person’s body. So I don’t think wearable art will be much help. The Zero Waste Leadership Clinic I attended on Saturday also held opportunities to share personal stories, facts and figures to further engage in the conversations we were having. As we discussed the dangers of one-use plastics, one thing that Mr. Hall said at the clinic really stuck with me: ” You could be buying a gelato, and you know those little plastic spoons that come with your ice cream? Well, you drop that on the ground when you’re done, and boom! One thousand years.” What he meant by this was that plastic took 1,000 years to naturally degrade, but the way he brought this fact into the conversation certainly made it more interesting, and more tangible. One instance in which I modified an idea to make it more acceptable to me was when emailing about mentorship. It was suggested I attend the Port Moody Wearable Art Awards, but as it is a little bit expensive, as no one else in my family would like to go, and as I most likely would not be able to talk to the artists (it is a performance and awards ceremony), I decided to check out some of the other options I had, and check back on the pictures and artists when the event was over. This way, I can still see if there are any artists whom I could talk to about mentorship, but I can devote my time and my family’s time to other priorities. In my case, I hope to finish a project around the same time the Wearable Art Awards are going on.

Which leads me to my next dilemna: I need bracelet clasps and chains. Unfortunately, these things are only tossed out when they break, which renders them unusable to me, so I’m going to have to buy them. Because the whole point of this project was to reduce waste, I really don’t want to buy anything. Right now I only need one clasp and a piece of crafting wire, so I’m going to check out Urban Source, which is a store in Vancouver that sells art materials that would have otherwise been thrown out. For example, they take film, leather scrap, cardboard, and lots of other materials that have been discarded by manufacturers. Now, their stock changes all the time, so I’m not sure if I’ll be able to find what I need. If I can’t, then I’ll have to buy things the regular way, either from the dollar store or Micheal’s. However, hopefully when I go over there I’ll be able to find what I need and snoop around about their workshop sessions – you can book instructional workshops, but seeing as it’s just me, I might just see what tips I can get from talking to the people at the store.

 

I’ll probably post again this week/ weekend with pictures of what I’ve been up to. See you next time on In-Depth 2015.